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The Trouble With Person-Centred Planning

Author: John O'Brien

Person-centred planning has been one of the most important innovations in the lives of people with intellectual disabilities, opening up a rich pathway into deeper human understandings and passionate and engaged social change. But like so many social innovations, with 'success' comes trouble.

In this short but important paper John O'Brien, one of the innovators who developed person-centred planning, reflects on the trouble that comes as systems begin to adopt the innovation - and, so often - undermine its essential strengths. Yet, as John reminds us, the beauty of person-centred planning remains, for we can continue to look beyond the system, nothing forces us to obey its constraints, real humanity can keep on breaking through.


The publisher is John O'Brien.

The Trouble With Person-Centred Planning © John O'Brien 2014.

All Rights Reserved. No part of this paper may be reproduced in any form without permission from the publisher except for the quotation of brief passages in reviews.

Documents

Library

Person Centred Planners Lose the Plot

Person Centred Planners Lose the Plot

The story of how one self-advocate with learning difficulties came into conflict with the Person Centred Planning industry.

Person-Centred vs System-Centred with Beth Mount

Person-Centred vs System-Centred

This film by Open Future Learning with Beth Mount explores Person-Centred vs System-Centred planning.

Citizenship & Person-Centered Work

Citizenship & Person-Centered Work

This new book, edited by John O'Brien & Carol Blessing, shares the invaluable learning of leaders from the Inclusion Movement.

Working on the Inside

Working on the Inside

Kate Fulton offers insight into the inner dimension of change that is essential to working respectfully and with compassion.

Reflections on Common Threads

Reflections on Common Threads

John O'Brien shares learning on Approaches and Contexts for Planning Everyday Lives following the Common Threads conference in Ontario in April 2014.